Bayfield Boatyards Sailboat

William Jowett arrived in Bayfield from England in 1833. He purchased much of Bayfield’s shoreline, building a prominent home on the ridge overlooking the waters. Unfortunately, the house was destroyed by a large fire in 1930.

For over 100 years, that same cliff on the river’s north shore has drawn thousands of summer visitors. In the 1860s, crowds would come to picnic and visit the beaches – the beginning of what would become a cottage haven for the region.

The ridge, now known as Jowett’s Grove, had a dance pavilion until the 1950s. Teenagers would line a one-lane bridge to attend dances at the Pavilion on Wednesday and Saturday nights, listening to big bands such as Guy Lombardo. Renovations took place in the 1960s, transitioning the area around the Pavillion to a popular trailer park. Rock bands eventually replaced dance bands, and the area became even more popular.

Although no liquor was legally available in Bayfield then, the Pavilion became a popular spot for the airmen stationed at Clinton Radar School (WWII). Occasionally there were fights between the men in the Air Force and local Bayfield men “protecting their home turf.”

Today, this area is the Harbour Lights subdivision – established in the 1980s.

Represented here is the Bayfield Boatyards Sailboat, built by a Canadian boat builder Bayfield Boat Yard Limited originally based in Bayfield, Ontario, and later in nearby Clinton, Ontario. The company specialized in the design and manufacture of fibreglass sailboats. The company was founded by Ted Gozzard in 1970 and continued in business until a plant fire forced its closure in 1988.

About The Artist Joanne McKenzie

“My sail painting is inspired by the ‘Jowett’s Dancing Pavilion” constructed in 1920 on the north shore of the Bayfield River. The “Pav” as it was fondly referred to was a beautiful Victorian inspired building overlooking the lake with a broad screened veranda and a balcony above the dance floor.”

Bayfield in the Roaring ’20’s was a popular summer resort destination for affluent Detroit families. Stylish American flappers brought to Bayfield the latest music and fashions of the Jazz Age. Local youngsters flocked to the Bayfield pavilion eager to learn the latest dance crazes like the Charleston, the JitterBug and the sinfully scandalous Black Bottom from their more worldly American visitors.

I found this information in the For the Love of Bayfield (2012) and it sounded so romantic and harkened back to a magical time that we can only dream about today. Wouldn’t it be cool to tell all your friends — “Meet me at the Pav” on Saturday and dance the night away!

BIO

Art in all its forms has been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember. Like most children, I could always be found scribbling on the wall or hanging out at the paint station. However, it was in high school when I took my first formal oil painting lessons—that the artistic seed took hold. Nowadays I am into many endeavours including large abstract acrylic paintings, macrame, ceramics, rug hooking and quilt making. I studied Fine Art at the University of Waterloo as well as many Master Artist paint classes over the years. My artistic works are joyful expressions that are inspired by anything and everything . I can’t imagine a day going by without being in my studio—for me— it is one of lifes’ greatest pleasures.

joannemckenzie5@gmail.com

Joanne MacKenzie

Click here to meet the Blacksmith who designed and built the boats, Jim Wallace.

Joanne MacKenzie

About The Artist Joanne McKenzie

“My sail painting is inspired by the ‘Jowett’s Dancing Pavilion” constructed in 1920 on the north shore of the Bayfield River. The “Pav” as it was fondly referred to was a beautiful Victorian inspired building overlooking the lake with a broad screened veranda and a balcony above the dance floor.”

Bayfield in the Roaring ’20’s was a popular summer resort destination for affluent Detroit families. Stylish American flappers brought to Bayfield the latest music and fashions of the Jazz Age. Local youngsters flocked to the Bayfield pavilion eager to learn the latest dance crazes like the Charleston, the JitterBug and the sinfully scandalous Black Bottom from their more worldly American visitors.

I found this information in the For the Love of Bayfield (2012) and it sounded so romantic and harkened back to a magical time that we can only dream about today. Wouldn’t it be cool to tell all your friends — “Meet me at the Pav” on Saturday and dance the night away!

BIO

Art in all its forms has been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember. Like most children, I could always be found scribbling on the wall or hanging out at the paint station. However, it was in high school when I took my first formal oil painting lessons—that the artistic seed took hold. Nowadays I am into many endeavours including large abstract acrylic paintings, macrame, ceramics, rug hooking and quilt making. I studied Fine Art at the University of Waterloo as well as many Master Artist paint classes over the years. My artistic works are joyful expressions that are inspired by anything and everything . I can’t imagine a day going by without being in my studio—for me— it is one of lifes’ greatest pleasures.

joannemckenzie5@gmail.com

Click here to meet the Blacksmith who designed and built the boats, Jim Wallace.

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